CLASSIC CLIPS TOP 100 GREATEST SCIENCE FICTION \ FANTASY MOVIES OF ALL TIME

The Criteria for our top 100 list are as follows: 1) Ground Breaking Cinematography and Special Effects (excluding CGI, which we consider, mostly but not entirely, to be over used and a lazy form of Art), 2) Groundbreaking and/or Original Plot, 3) Superlative Screenplay (original or adaptation), 4) Great Acting, 5) Great Directing and Producing, 6) Great Film editing, including Sound, and, 7) Lasting, memorable and original Musical Score. Other criteria include character development, level of suspense, intrigue, tension and sustained interest. The list of movies below contain at least one or more of the above elements, beginning with our pic for the # 100 spot.

 

100. The Golem, how he came into the world (1920)
Inspired by an ancient Jewish legend

The film was the first of a trilogy produced by Wegener, followed by The Golem and the Dancing Girl (1917) and The Golem: How He Came into the World (1920).

Der Golem (GermanDer Golem, shown in the US as The Monster of Fate) is a 1915 Germansilent horror partially lost film, written and directed by Paul Wegener and Henrik Galeen. It was inspired by an ancient Jewish legend, the most prevalent version of the myth involving 16th century Rabbi Judah Loew ben Bezalel who created the Golem to protect his people from anti-Semites. Wegener claimed the film was based on Gustav Meyrink's 1915 novel The Golem, but Troy Howarth states "it is more likely that (the screenwriters) simply drew upon European folklore". - Source Wikipedia

While filming The Student of Prague (1913), Paul Wegener heard the 16th century legend of Rabbi Loew, who tradition says saved the Jews of Prague from persecution by creating a Golem – a clay statue infused with life – to protect them. Wegener became captivated by the story and made a film version inspired by it in 1915 called The Golem, and then in 1917 The Golem and the Dancing Girl, considered the first film sequel (if one does not count serials). Source - The Revenant Review

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99. The Lost World (1925)
Produced by First National Pictures

This adventure virtually butchers its source, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novel. But with stop-motion photography and special effects that were incredibly innovative in 1924 and 1925, who cared? These effects were the whole film, and Wallace Beery's inspired performance was a bonus. The tale opens on reporter Edward Malone (Lloyd Hughes), who wants to marry Gladys Hungerford (Alma Bennett). Gladys, however, only wants to marry a man of great deeds. So Malone, having asked his editor for an adventuresome assignment, is given the task of interviewing Professor Challenger (Beery), who is planning an expedition to a "lost world." Malone accompanies Challenger and his men to South America where, on a great plateau, they find a prehistoric world occupied by dinosaurs and ape-like men. They barely escape with their lives, but they manage to bring a brontosaurus back to London. The beast breaks out and terrorizes the city before crashing through the London bridge and swimming out toward the ocean to freedom. In the midst of all this, Malone has fallen in love with Paula White, the daughter of an explorer (Bessie Love). Since Gladys, it turns out, has married a clerk, Malone is able to wed his new sweetheart. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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98. The Last Man On Earth (1964)
Filmed in Rome, completed at Esposizione Universale Roma

The Last Man on Earth is a 1964 black-and-white science fiction horror film based on the 1954 novel I Am Legend by Richard Matheson. The film was produced by Robert L. Lippert, directed by Ubaldo Ragona and Sidney Salkow, and stars Vincent Price. The screenplay was written in part by Matheson, but he was dissatisfied with the result and chose to be credited as "Logan Swanson". William Leicester, Furio M. Monetti, and Ubaldo Ragona finished the script.

The Last Man on Earth was filmed in Rome, with scenes being completed at Esposizione Universale Roma. It was released in the US and the UK by American International Pictures. In the 1980s the film entered the public domain. MGM Home Video, the current owners of the AIP film catalog, released a digitally remastered widescreen print of the film on DVD in September 2005. - Source Wikipedia

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97. Videodrome (1983)
A Canadian science fiction horror film 

When Max Renn goes looking for edgy new shows for his sleazy cable TV station, he stumbles across the pirate broadcast of a hyperviolent torture show called Videodrome. As he struggles to unearth the origins of the program, he embarks on a hallucinatory journey into a shadow world of right-wing conspiracies, sadomasochistic sex games, and bodily transformation. Starring James Woods and Deborah Harry in one of her first film roles, Videodrome is one of writer/director David Cronenberg’s most original and provocative works, fusing social commentary with shocking elements of sex and violence. With groundbreaking special effects makeup by Academy Award®-winner Rick Baker, Videodrome has come to be regarded as one of the most influential and mind-bending science fiction films of the 1980s. - Source The Criterion Collection

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96. The Magic Sword (1962)
Based on the medieval legend of Saint George and the Dragon

This medieval adventure fantasy has Saint George (Gary Lockwood) as the hero battling the forces of evil. He incurs the wrath of the villainous Lodac (Basil Rathbone) who uses all his dark powers to stop our hero. George fights a giant ogre, a two headed dragon, witches and rescues the fair Princess Helene (Anne Helm) from becoming dragon food. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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95. The Iron Giant (1999)
Winner of nine Annie Awards out of 15 nominations

"Iron Giant" is based upon the 1968 story,'Iron Man,' by the British poet laureate Ted Hughes. The film is about a giant metal machine that drops from the sky and frightens a small town in Maine in 1958, only to find a friend named, Hogarth, that ultimately finds its humanity and saving the towns people of their fears and prejudices. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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Honorable Mentions


Fantastic Planet (2004)


 
 

94. X - The Man With The X-Ray Eyes (1963)
Shot in three weeks on a budget of under $300,000

By the 1960's cult director Roger Corman had transcended his B-movie roots and demonstrated that horror and science fiction films could be vehicles for intelligent and literate storytelling.

"X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes" bears comparison with the best films of the era, in particular Jack Arnold's masterpiece "The Incredible Shrinking Man"(1957). The story concerns Dr James Xavier, ably portrayed by Ray Milland. He has invented a serum for improving human vision. When his funding is cut he proceeds to experiment on himself. The script is initially dull and talky, but once the exposition is dealt with the film can begin in earnest.

Dr Xavier's experiments succeed beyond his expectations. He initially displays an almost childlike delight at his discovery, indulging in schoolboy pranks such as observing women's underwear at a dance party. The film takes a darker turn when he inadvertently causes the death of a colleague and is forced to go on the run. He flees across a landscape rendered increasingly bizarre and surreal by his X-ray vision. - Source BBC

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93. Beetlejuice (1988)
Winner of 3 Saturn Awards, Including Best Horror film

Beetlejuice is a 1988 American fantasy-comedy-horror film directed by Tim Burton, produced by The Geffen Company and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures. The plot revolves around a recently deceased young couple (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis) who become ghosts haunting their former home, and an obnoxious, devious poltergeist named Betelgeuse (pronounced and occasionally spelled Beetlejuice in the movie and portrayed by Michael Keaton) from the Netherworld who tries to scare away the new inhabitants (Catherine O'HaraJeffrey Jones, and Winona Ryder) permanently.

After the success of Pee-wee's Big Adventure, Burton was sent several scripts and became disheartened by their lack of imagination and originality. When he was sent Michael McDowell's original script for Beetlejuice, Burton agreed to direct, although Larry Wilson and later Warren Skaaren were hired to rewrite it. Beetlejuice was a critical and commercial success, grossing US$73.7 million from a budget of US$15 million. It won the Academy Award for Best Makeup and three Saturn AwardsBest Horror FilmBest Makeup, and Best Supporting Actress for Sylvia Sidney, her final award before her death in 1999.

The film spawned an animated television series, video games, and a stage musical. - Source Wikipedia

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92. Them! (1954)
An American black-and-white science fiction monster film 

OK, let’s state the obvious from the start: movies about giant insects or reptiles, whether they are ants, tarantulas, scorpions, or lizards, are silly, sophomoric, and stupid. There, I said it. But some can deliver loads of fun and warrant critical acclaim. Them! certainly falls into both categories, not only because it was the seminal giant-insect creature feature film of the 1950s, but because amidst its surreal premises lurks an army of portents that foreshadow the absurd cosmological repercussions of the dawning Nuclear Age. - Source ClassicHorror.com

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91. This Island, Earth (1955)
Praised by critics for its special effects

For reasons that defy logic, the excellent This Island Earth was held up for ridicule as an allegedly bad movie in the film version of TV's Mystery Science Theater. If not the best science-fiction film of the 1950s, This Island Earth is certainly one of the most intelligent and elaborate. 

The story begins when the image of Exeter (Jeff Morrow), a huge-domed scientific genius from the planet Metaluna, appears on an experimental 3D television screen. Exeter invites several noted scientists from around the world to work on a top-secret project at Exeter's earthly mansion. Among those accepting the invitation are Cal Meacham (Rex Reason) and his ex-fiancee Ruth Adams (Faith Domergue). Soon, Cal and Ruth learn Exeter's true motives; to use the Earth's atomic knowhow in building a defense shield to protect Metaluna against the enemy planet Zahgon. Eventually, Exeter boards his high-tech flying saucer and whisks Cal and Ruth off to his dying planet, where, among other perils, they are menaced by a hideous mutant. Based on a novel by Raymond F. Jones, This Island Earth is one of those rare 1950s speculative films that holds up as well today as it did when first released, despite the comparative quaintness of the special effects and high-tech paraphernalia. Incidentally, the climactic Metalunan scenes were directed by Universal's resident sci-fi specialist, Jack Arnold.- Source Rotten Tomatoes

In first half of the fifties, primarily three major studios dabbled in science fiction. Paramount was the front runner, thanks to the lavish Technicolor sci-fi epics ofGeorge Pal. Warner got in it for the money when they realised there was a profit to be made from giant radioactive monsters like those in The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953, review) and Them! (1954, review). Universal was probably the one that made the most interesting pictures, because of their range and their quirks. And in 1955, the studio made their most expensive science fiction film to that date, This Island Earth, an ambitious space opera in Technicolor with impressive effects and artwork. - Source Scifist

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90. Things To Come (1936)
A landmark in cinematic design

A landmark collaboration between writer H. G. Wells, producer Alexander Korda, and designer and director William Cameron Menzies, Things to Come is a science fiction film like no other, a prescient political work that predicts a century of turmoil and progress. Skipping through time, Things to Come bears witness to world war, disease, dictatorship, and, finally, utopia. Conceived, written, and overseen by Wells himself as an adaptation of his own work, this megabudget production, the most ambitious ever from Korda’s London Films, is a triumph of imagination and technical audacity. - Source The Criterion Collection

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89. 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (1954)
Winner of 2 Academy Awards

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a 1954 American Technicolor adventure film and the first science fiction film shot in CinemaScope. The film was personally produced by Walt Disney through Walt Disney Productions, directed by Richard Fleischer, and stars Kirk DouglasJames MasonPaul Lukas, and Peter Lorre. It was also the first feature-length Disney film to be distributed by Buena Vista Distribution. The film is adapted from Jules Verne's 19th-century novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. It is considered an early precursor of the steampunk genre.

The film was a critical and commercial success, being especially remembered for the fight with a giant squid, and Mason's definitive performance as the charismatic anti-hero Captain Nemo. It won two Academy Awards for Best Art Direction and Best Special Effects.

n 1868, rumors of a sea monster attacking ships in the Pacific Ocean have disrupted shipping lanes. The United States invites Professor Pierre M. Aronnax and his assistant, Conseil, onto a Navy expedition to prove the monster's existence. On board with them is the cocky master harpooner Ned Land.

After months of searching, the "monster" is spotted shortly before it rams the warship. Ned and Aronnax are thrown overboard, and Conseil goes in after Aronnax. The helpless, crippled frigate drifts away, and no one aboard responds to the overboard passengers. The three find a strange-looking metal vessel, and realize the "monster" is a man-made "submerging boat" that appears deserted. Aronnax finds a large viewport and witnesses an underwater funeral. - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea (1961)


 
 

88. On The Beach (1959)
Nominated for 2 Academy Awards

Although there'd been doomsday dramas before it, Stanley Kramer's On the Beach was considered the first important entry in this genre when originally released in 1959. Based on the novel by Nevil Shute, the film is set in the future (1964) when virtually all life on earth has been exterminated by the radioactive residue of a nuclear holocaust. Only Australia has been spared, but it's only a matter of time before everyone Down Under also succumbs to radiation poisoning. With only a short time left on earth, the Australian population reacts in different ways: some go on a nonstop binge of revelry, while others eagerly consume the suicide pills being issued by the government. When the possibility arises that rains have washed the atmosphere clean in the Northern hemisphere, a submarine commander (Gregory Peck) and his men head to San Diego, where faint radio signals have been emanating. The movie's all-star cast includes: Peck as the stalwart sub captain, Ava Gardner as his emotionally disturbed lover, Fred Astaire as a guilt-wracked nuclear scientist, and Anthony Perkins and Donna Anderson as the just starting out in life married couple. - Source Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

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87. Robinson Crusoe On Mars (1964)
Independently made American science fiction film in Technicolorand Techniscope

Robinson Crusoe on Mars is in many ways like The Martian of its time and it begins with the information that: ‘This film is scientifically authentic – it is only one step ahead of present reality.’

Of course, this isn’t really true but likely helped sell the film to some sci-fi fans in 1964. And to be fair it probably was reasonably convincing at the time, for example, the modular landing system was a brand spanking new piece of technology then and while the idea of any astronaut swimming in a pool of water on this particular planet isn’t something I would like to wager money on, NASA did recently confirm that liquid water does flow intermittently on Mars.

Like Mark Watney in The Martian, Kit Draper (Paul Mantee) is an American astronaut left stranded on Mars who must discover ways to somehow survive in a desolate environment with only a million to one hope of ever being rescued.

There is only a very limited supply of food rations and only enough oxygen to last for sixty hours. Initially there appears to be no source of heat, no water, no shelter, and no other life on Mars let alone sailors fighting in any dance hall or lawmen beating up the wrong guy. - Source louderthanwar.com

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86. Fantastic Voyage (1966)
Winner of 2 Academy Awards

A FANTASTIC AND SPECTACULAR VOYAGE… THROUGH THE HUMAN BODY… INTO THE BRAIN.

The science of miniaturization has been unlocked, and the army has big plans. But when a scientist carrying the secret of the process is injured in a surprise attack, a life-threatening blood clot puts him into a coma. Now, a team of adventurers will have to use the technology to travel inside his body and destroy the clot. - Source letterboxd.com

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85. Communion (1989)
Based on author Whitley Strieber's account of Alien Encounters

Communion is a 1989 drama horror film based on the book of the same name by Whitley Strieber

Starring Christopher Walken and Frances Sternhagen, it tells a story of a family that experiences an extraterrestrial phenomenon while on vacation at a remote home in the wilderness during which the father is abducted and all of their lives change. According to Strieber, the story is a real-life account of his own encounter with "visitors", with Walken playing the role of the author. - Source Wikipedia

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84. Artificial Intelligence (1972)
Nominated for 2 Academy Awards

Stanley Kubrick always referred to the story as "Pinocchio." It mirrored the tale of a puppet who dreams of becoming a real boy. And what, after all, is an android but a puppet with a computer program pulling its strings? The project that eventually became Steven Spielberg's "A. I. Artificial Intelligence" (2001) was abandoned by Kubrick because he wasn't satisfied with his approaches to its central character, David, an android who appears to be a real little boy. Believing special effects wouldn't be adequate and a human actor would seem too human, he turned the project over to his friend Spielberg. Legend has it he made that decision after being impressed by Spielberg's special effects in "Jurassic Park," but perhaps "E. T." was also an influence: If Spielberg could create an alien who evoked human emotions, could he do the same with an android? - Source  

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83. Jack The Giant Killer (1962)
Features extensive use of stop-motion animation

Jack the Giant Killer is a 1962 heroic fantasy adventure film starring Kerwin Mathews in a fairy tale story about a young man who defends a princess against a sorcerer's giants and demons.

The film was loosely based on the traditional tale "Jack the Giant Killer" and features extensive use of stop-motion animation. The film was directed by Nathan H. Juran and later re-edited and re-released as a musical by producer Edward Small. The reason for this change was on the grounds that Columbia Pictures, which released The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, threatened to sue Small. The original print without the music got released 30 years later with no protest from Columbia Pictures, while United Artists continues to own the rights to the musical version of the film. The film brought together Mathews, Juran, Small, and actor Torin Thatcher, all four of whom worked on 7th Voyage. - Source Wikipedia

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82. Alphaville (1965)
A French New Wave science fiction noir film 

In Alphaville, Jean-Luc Godard fuses a hardboiled detective story with science fiction. Lemmy Caution (Eddie Constantine), a hero Godard borrowed from a series of French adventure films, comes to Alphaville, the capital of a totalitarian state, in order to destroy its leader, an almost-human computer called Alpha 60. While on his mission, Lemmy meets and falls in love with Natacha (Anna Karina), the daughter of the scientist who designed Alpha 60. Their love becomes the most profound challenge to the computer's control. Void of any flashy special effects, Alphaville uses 1960s Paris to depict the city of the future. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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81. The Day The Earth Caught Fire (1961)
Received the 1962 BAFTA for Best Film Screenplay

Despite its come-on title, The Day the Earth Caught Fire is an intelligent, disturbing piece of speculative fiction. Through the eyes of British reporter Peter Stenning (Edward Judd), we learn that both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. have simultaneously set off nuclear explosions to test their efficiency. The twin blasts have caused the Earth to go off its axis. The result is a disastrous upheaval in the balance of nature; floods and fires being the principal plagues. With the end of the world staring everyone in the face, chaos reigns. The only hope lies in another massive nuclear explosion, which will hopefully rebalance the Earth. The film ends ambiguously, with viewers allowed to decide for themselves whether or not the world has been saved. In the original prints of The Day the Earth Caught Fire, the opening and closing reels were tinted yellow, representing the scorching heat beating down on the frightened populace. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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80. Solaris (1972)
A Soviet made science fiction art film

In the early 1970s, Tarkovsky, unable to get approval for a script that was considered too personal-obscurantist, proposed a film adaptation of Stanislaw Lem’s novel Solaris, thinking it stood a better chance of being green-lit by the commissars, as science fiction seemed more “objective” and accessible to the masses.

His hunch paid off, and Solaris (1972) went on to take the Grand Jury Prize at Cannes. Tarkovsky had arrived on the world stage with his most straightforward, accessible work. While hardly a conventional film, Solaris is less long-take-driven, and stands as a fulcrum in Tarkovsky’s career: behind him were his impressive debut, Ivan’s Childhood (1962), and his first epic masterpiece,Andrei Rublev (1966); ahead of him lay The Mirror (1975; brilliantly experimental and, yes, personal-obscurantist), Stalker (1979; a great, somber, difficult work), and finally, two intransigent, lyrical, meditative pictures he made in exile, Nostalghia (1983) and The Sacrifice (1986). He died shortly after completing this last film, at age fifty-four. - Source The Criterion Collection

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79. Westworld (1973)
MGM's biggest box office success of the year

Westworld is a 1973 American science fiction Western thriller film written and directed by Michael Crichton. Its plot concerns amusement park androids that malfunction and begin killing visitors. It stars Yul Brynner as an android in a futuristic Western-themed amusement park, and Richard Benjamin and James Brolin as guests of the park.

The film was from an original screenplay by novelist Crichton, and served as his feature directorial debut. It was also the first feature film to use digital image processing to pixellate photography to simulate an android point of view. The film was nominated for HugoNebula, and Saturn awards.

Westworld was followed by a sequel, Futureworld (1976), and a short-lived television series, Beyond Westworld (1980). A television series based on the film debuted in 2016 on HBO. - Source Wikipedua

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78. THX 1138 (1971)
Received critical acclaim and gained a cult following

Director George Lucas’s first full-length film is a stark, cold sci-fi thriller set in an underground society, its denizens drugged into a cattle-like state of being ruled by a super-rational computer-driven bureaucracy enforced by eerily polite chrome-faced robot police officers.

It’s an unrelenting socio-political statement on consumption, religion, government and the struggle for individuality. On paper bearing all the hallmarks of a film student’s first outing - too heavy-handed for its own good—yet somehow executed with a subtlety and grace, a poetry even, that makes it linger long after the last frame rolls across the screen. It’s remarkable not simply because it’s an obtuse film (there are after all plenty unremarkable obtuse films around) but because it is a virtuoso piece of film-making, combining its unique style of photography—disconnected, observing and visually distinct - with an unparalleled collage-like soundscape from the hands of Walter Murch. - Source Kitbashed

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77. Jason And The Argonauts (1961)
 Based on Greek mythology

Jason and the Argonauts (working titleJason and the Golden Fleece) is a 1963 Anglo-American independently made fantasy film produced by Charles H. Schneer and directed by Don Chaffey. Based on Greek mythology, the film stars Todd Armstrong as the eponymous hero, along with Nancy KovackHonor Blackman, and Gary Raymond. it was distributed by Columbia Pictures.

Shot in Eastman Color, the film was made in collaboration with stop-motion animation master Ray Harryhausen and is known for its various fantasy creatures, notably the iconic fight scene featuring seven skeleton warriors.

The film score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, who also worked with Harryhausen on the fantasy films The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958), The 3 Worlds of Gulliver (1960), and Mysterious Island (1961). - Source Wikipedia

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76. Scanners (1981)
Nominated for Best Special Effects

The title of this David Cronenberg sci-fi horror film refers to a group of people who have telekinetic powers that allow them to read minds and give them the ability to make other people's heads explode. The children of a group of women who took an experimental tranquilizer during their pregnancies, the scanners are now adults and have become outcasts from society. But Darryl (Michael Ironside) decides to create an army of scanners to take over the world. The only person who can stop him is his brother Cameron (Stephen Lack), who wants to forget that he was ever a scanner. Winner of the International Fantasy Film Award at the 1983 Fantasporto Film Festival, Scanners was followed by a pair of sequels, neither of which involved Cronenberg. - Source Matthew Tobey, Rovi

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75. They Live (1988)
Received negative, critic reviews, but later enjoyed a cult following

Was John Carpenter's They Live in 1988 a warning to us?

One of movies' greatest one liners was spoken by Rody Piper, who played George Nada as he strolls casually into a bank to blast the alines masquerading as humans he finds there: "I have come here to chew bubble gum and kick ass, and I'm all out of bubble gum."

The line is still quipped today, at least by those who saw the movie and understood its clear, dire warnings and messages, which are subliminal for all but those who wear the special glasses that can see through it all. Subliminal messaging is nothing new, of course, but the movie They Live really puts things into perspective for us. - Source Classicclips.ca

YOU SEE THEM ON THE STREET. YOU WATCH THEM ON TV. YOU MIGHT EVEN VOTE FOR ONE THIS FALL. YOU THINK THEY’RE PEOPLE JUST LIKE YOU. YOU’RE WRONG. DEAD WRONG.

Nada, a wanderer without meaning in his life, discovers a pair of sunglasses capable of showing the world the way it truly is. As he walks the streets of Los Angeles, Nada notices that both the media and the government are comprised of subliminal messages meant to keep the population subdued, and that most of the social elite are skull-faced aliens bent on world domination. With this shocking discovery, Nada fights to free humanity from the mind-controlling aliens. - Source letterboxd

Drones in the sky, conspiracies in our heads, militarized police in the streets, economic inequality in every corner of society, media that seeks to control our minds: The terror of They Live is more tangible and primal in 2018 than a slasher movie could ever be. - Source The Ringer

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74. The Time Machine (1960)
 Winner of Academy Award for Best Special Effects

The Time Machine (1960 Film) is the first film adaptation of The Time Machine (Novel). The film stars Rod Taylor as George, who invents a Time Machine, as well as Yvette Mimieux as Weena.

The film was produced and directed by George Pal, who had earlier made a film version of Wells's The War of the Worlds (1953). Pal always intended to make a sequel to The Time Machine, but he died before it could be produced; the end of Time Machine: The Journey Back functions as a sequel of sorts. In 1985, elements of this film were incorporated into The Fantasy Film Worlds of George Pal, produced by Arnold Leibovit.

An inventor named George has invented The Time Machine, and uses it to travel to the far future. He witnesses his world grow and change, only to be consumed by war. Finally, he arrives at an idyllic time in the year 802,701 AD, inhabited by a posthuman race known as the Eloi. He later discovers that they're controlled by the evil Morlocks.

The film received an Oscar for time-lapse photographic effects showing the world changing rapidly. - Source Fandom

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73. Altered States (1980)
Nominated for 2 Academy Awards

In this 1980 sci-fi horror film, William Hurt plays Eddie Jessup, a scientist obsessed with discovering mankind's true role in the universe. To this end, he submits himself to a series of mind-expanding experiments. By enclosing himself in a sensory-deprivation chamber and taking hallucinogenic drugs, Jessup hopes to explore different levels of human consciousness, but instead is devolved into an apelike monster. Director Ken Russell helmed Altered States from a script by Paddy Chayefsky, who adapted his own novel of the same name. Unhappy with the finished product, Chayefsky had his name replaced with his pseudonym Sydney Aaron. - Source Rotte Tomatoes

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72. Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)
Nominated for a BAFTA Award for Best Art Direction

Nineteen Eighty-Four, also known as 1984, is a 1984 British dystopian science fiction film written and directed by Michael Radford, based upon George Orwell's novel of the same name. Starring John HurtRichard BurtonSuzanna Hamilton, and Cyril Cusack, the film follows the life of Winston Smith, a low-ranking civil servant in a war-torn London ruled by Oceania, a totalitarian superstate. Smith (Hurt) struggles to maintain his sanity and his grip on reality as the regime's overwhelming power and influence persecutes individualism and individual thinking on both a political and personal level.

The film, which features Burton's last screen appearance, is dedicated to him. The film was nominated for a BAFTA Award for Best Art Direction, and won two Evening Standard British Film Awards for Best Film and Best Actor. - Source Wikipedia

Orwell‘s stark vision of totalitarianism is set in a world where absolute conformity in action, word and thought – including loyalty to “Big Brother” – is demanded. After the Atomic War, the world is divided into three vast states whose inhabitants are dominated by all-powerful governments. Winston Smith (Hurt), a worker, starts an illegal love affair with Julia (Suzanna Hamilton), and becomes the target of a brain-washing campaign to force him to conform. Also starring Sir Richard Burton (in his final film role) and Cyril Cusack. - Source Rio Theatre

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71. Super 8 (2016)
Received several awards and nominations for technical and
special effects

Super 8 is a 2011 American science fiction monster thriller film written, co-produced, and directed by J. J. Abrams and produced by Steven Spielberg. The film stars Joel CourtneyElle Fanning, and Kyle Chandler and tells the story of a group of young teenagers who are filming their own Super 8 movie when a train derails, releasing a dangerous presence into their town. The film was shot in Weirton, West Virginia and surrounding areas, masquerading as the fictional town of Lillian, Ohio.

Super 8 was released on June 10, 2011, in conventional and IMAX theaters in the United States. The film was well received, with critics praising the film for its nostalgic elements, visual effects, musical score, and for the performances of the cast, in particular, both Fanning and newcomer Courtney's acting was cited, while also being compared to such thematically similar films as E.T.Stand by Me, and The GooniesSuper 8 was also a commercial success, grossing over $260 million against a $50 million budget. The film received several awards and nominations, primarily in technical and special effects categories, Giacchino's musical score, as well as for Courtney and Fanning's performances. - Source Wikipedia

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70. Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind (2004)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay

The second feature from director Michel Gondry (Human Nature) finds the filmmaker reteaming with screenwriter Charlie Kaufman for this off-the-wall romantic comedy. Jim Carrey stars as Joel Barish, a man who is informed that his ex-girlfriend Clementine (Kate Winslet) has had her memories of their relationship erased from her brain via an experimental procedure performed by Dr. Mierzwiak (Tom Wilkinson). Not to be outdone, Joel decides to have the same procedure done to himself. As Mierzwiak's bumbling underlings Stan (Mark Ruffalo) and Patrick (Elijah Wood) perform the operation on Joel -- over the course of an evening, in his apartment -- Joel struggles in his own mind to save the memories of Clementine from being deleted. Kirsten Dunst, David Cross, and Jane Adams also star. - Source Matthew Tobey, Rovi

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69. Pan's Labyrinth (2006)
Winner of 3 Academy Awards

Mexican filmmaker Guillermo del Toro returns to the phantasmagorical cinema that defined such early fare as Cronos and The Devil's Backbone with this haunting fantasy-drama set in the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War and detailing the strange journeys of an imaginative young girl who may be the mythical princess of an underground kingdom. Her mother, Carmen (Ariadna Gil), recently remarried to sadistic army captain Vidal (Sergi Lpez) and soon to bear the cruel military man's child, shy young Ofelia (Ivana Baquero) is forced to entertain herself as her recently-formed family settles into their new home nestled deep in the Spanish countryside. Source - Rotten Tomatoes

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68. Metropolis (1927)
For it's time, Incredible Futuristic, Special Effects

One of the biggest, strangest, maddest films in cinema history - Fritz Lang's 1927 film is a crazed futurist epic, a mythic sprawl with something of Jung and Wagner, and dystopian nightmare about a city-state built on slave labour, whose prosperity depends on suppressing a mutinous underground race whose insurrectionist rage is beginning to bubble. Metropolis predicts the ideologies of class and race of the 20th century, and there is a perennial frisson in the way the workers' leader Maria longs for a messianic figure who can find a middle way between the head and the heart, the bosses and the workers: he will be the Mediator, or the "Mittler" – a word that has a chilling echo with another real-life leader who at the time of Metropolis's premiere had a few seats in the Reichstag. The "Maschinenmensch" robot based on Maria is a brilliant eroticisation and fetishisation of modern technology and the current crisis in Dubai, whose economic boom was founded on a colossal import of globalised labour, makes Metropolis seem very contemporary. - Source The Guardian

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67. Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959)
Nominated for 3 Academy Awards

Journey to the Center of the Earth is an American science-fiction film, released in 1959 that was an adaptation  of Jules Verne’s classic novel of the same name. Especially noted for its special effects, the film was nominated for three Academy Awards.

Professor Oliver Lindenbrook (played by  James Mason), an intrepid 19th-century Scottish explorer, leads an electic group of adventurers on an expedition to explore the centre of Earth. There Lindenbrook’s expedition discovers such wonders as giant mushrooms, extinct dimetrodons, and the lost city of Atlantis.

Journey to the Center of the Earth was one of several films based on Verne’s novels that followed the great success of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), which also starred Mason. Some aspects of the film seem dated by modern standards, especially those scenes in which then teen idol  Pat Boone, who played Lindenbrook’s student, croons love songs. However, the film’s special effects were excellent for their day, and the story can still hold the viewer, thanks mostly to the charismatic performance of Mason - Source britannica.com


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66. The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951)
Considered culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant
by the National Film Registry

The Day the Earth Stood Still, American science-fiction film, released in 1951, that is considered a classic of the genre and that reflects the fears and anxiety of the Cold War era and nascnet atomic age.

A flying saucer lands in Washington, D.C., carrying Klaatu (played by  Michael Rennie) and his robot servant  Gort ( Lock Martin). Klaatu is shot shortly after landing and is taken to an army hospital. Klaatu tells the president’s secretary that he wants to meet the leaders of Earth but soon is told that an agreement on a meeting site has proved impossible to obtain. Klaatu subsequently escapes from the hospital and takes a room in a boarding house, where he befriends a young widow, Helen Benson ( Patricia Neal), and her son, Bobby (Billy Gray). With Bobby’s help, Klaatu meets the eminent scientist Professor Barnhardt (Sam Jaffe) and reveals that he is a representative from a federation of other planets sent to Earth to warn humankind that their experiments with atomic weapons are threatening the safety of other civilizations. After Barnhardt tells Klaatu that he needs to demonstrate his power to Earth’s leaders, Klaatu arranges for the loss of all power on Earth except where such loss would be life-threatening. Realizing that he is the alien visitor, Helen helps Klaatu get back to his saucer. Before leaving, Klaatu warns Barnhardt and his fellow scientists that unless humankind gives up violence, other planets will destroy Earth in their own defense. - Source britannica.com

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65. Arrival (2016)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Sound Editing

When mysterious spacecraft touch down across the globe, an elite team - lead by expert linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) - are brought together to investigate. As mankind teeters on the verge of global war, Banks and the team race against time for answers - and to find them, she will take a chance that could threaten her life, and quite possibly humanity. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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64. Predator (1987)
Part sci-fi, part horror, part action - all muscle (Rotten Tomatoes)

Dutch (Arnold Schwarzenegger) has a code of honor which he will not violate, even when his life depends on it. Paradoxically, his code of honor gives him the backbone to survive as a military special forces operative when he is sent on a covert mission to rescue another group which was sent in to assist some nefarious U.S. government plan in a Latin American country. Once there, he encounters an old army buddy (Carl Weathers) who has gotten too deep in the CIA's good graces for Dutch's comfort. When he and his team go into the jungle to rescue the others, they get involved in a pitched battle with local guerillas, but they are more than capable of besting these vicious fighters. However, not long after that, they encounter signs that the equally capable men they were sent to rescue were all killed unawares and in an unusually gruesome fashion. Given their training, it should have been impossible for anyone to best all of these commando warriors. Soon, the men from Dutch's own team get picked off one by one, as they grow aware that they are up against something uncanny, not of this world, something that is hunting them for sport. Why? Because their skills make them worthy opponents for the perfectly camouflaged Predator. This carefully paced action movie was given poor reviews by many movie critics, but was sufficiently satisfying for its (largely male) audiences that a successful sequel (Predator 2) was released in 1990. - Source Clarke Fountain, Rovi

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63. Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1982)
Winner of the Saturn Award for Best International Film

Mad Max 2 (also known as The Road Warrior in the U.S., and Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior) is a 1981 Australian apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic action film directed by George Miller. This sequel to Miller's 1979 film Mad Max was a worldwide box office success that launched the career of lead actor Mel Gibson. The film's tale of a community of settlers moved to defend themselves against a roving band of marauders follows an archetypal "Western" frontier movie motif, as does Max's role as a hardened man who rediscovers his humanity when he decides to help the settlers. Reviewer Richard Scheib stated that Gibson's role could "just as easily be Clint Eastwood's tight-lipped Man With No Name" helping "...decent frightened folk" from the marauding Indians."

Noteworthy elements of the film include cinematographer Dean Semler's widescreen photography of Australia's vast desert landscapes (primarily the Mundi Mundi Plain in Silverton, New South Wales); the sparing use of dialogue throughout the film (which is almost non-existent during the opening and closing scenes); costume designer Norma Moriceau's punk mohawked, leather-bondage-gear wearing bikers; and its fast-paced, tightly-edited, and violent battle and chase scenes. - Source Fandom

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Honorable Mentions


Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)


Mad Max (1979)

 
 

62. When Worlds Collide (1951)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Special Effects

First published in 1932, Philip Wylie and Edwin Balmer's speculative novel When Worlds Collide was immediately purchased by Paramount as a possible project for director Cecil B. DeMille. But because none of Paramount's scriptwriters were able to come up with an adequate screen treatment, the property lay on the shelf until 1950, when producer George Pal was casting about for a follow-up to his successful sci-fier Destination Moon. Though the film was top-heavy with special effects, Pal was able to bring When Worlds Collide in for under a million dollars, thanks to an inexpensive cast and a heavy reliance upon stock footage. The story is set in motion when Dr. Cole Henderson (Larry Keating) announces that a extraterrestrial planet is on a collision course with the Earth. No one believes Henderson's story, save for crippled financier Stanton (John Hoyt), who finances the construction of a gigantic spaceship, built for the purpose of transporting selected survivors from the doomed Earth to another Earthlike planet. As it becomes obvious that Henderson's predictions will come true, a worldwide lottery is held to select those people who will be rescued from oblivion by Stanton's spaceship. In the climactic scenes, the worlds do indeed collide, with appropriately spectacular results. But will the spaceship, overloaded with humanity, be able to take off and seek out a Brave New World? Amidst the thrills, a romantic triangle emerges, involving Richard Derr, Barbara Rush and Peter Hanson. - Source Hal Erickson, Rovi

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61. RoboCop (1987)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Sound Effects Editing

RoboCop is a 1987 cyberpunk action film directed by Paul Verhoeven. Set in crime-ridden Detroit, Michigan, in the near future. RoboCop centers on a police officer named Alex J. Murphy who is murdered brutally by a vicious gang and subsequently re-created as a cyborg known as RoboCop. It includes larger themes regarding the media, gentrification and human nature in addition to being an action film. It has spawned merchandise, two sequels, a TV Series starring Richard Eden, a TV miniseries directed by Julian Grant, video games, and two comic book adaptations and an animated series. A remake was released on February 7, 2014.

- Source Fandom

In near-future Detroit, a murdered police officer is resurrected as an experimental crime-fighting cyborg named Robocop. Tormented by memories of his past, he soon deviates from his law enforcement program to seek revenge on his killers. This highly successful sci-fi action film balances ultraviolence with black comedy and cutting satire. - Source Rotten Tomatoes


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60. Gattaca (1997)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award

Gattaca is a 1997 science fiction film produced in the US that depicts a future society that uses reproductive technology and genetic engineering in order to produce genetically enhanced human beings. By selectively choosing certain genes, scientists and physicians ensure that individuals born using reproductive technologies have desirable physical and psychological traits and prevent undesirable traits. The film tells the story of Vincent Freeman, a man conceived without the aid of reproductive technology, who works to overcome his genetic disadvantages compared to his enhanced counterparts in order to achieve his dream of a career in space travel. The film was directed and written by Andrew Niccol and released by Columbia Pictures in Culver City, California, on 24 October 1997. Gattaca addresses the ethical uses of biotechnology, gene manipulation, and genetic engineering, and the film illustrates the debate over human genetic engineering research and implications. - Source The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

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59. The Fifth Element (1997)
Considered both the best and worst summer blockbuster of all time

Good and evil battle for the future of 23rd century Earth in this visually striking big-budget science fiction epic. In the movie's prologue, which is set in 1914, scientists gather in Egypt at the site of an event that transpired centuries earlier. Aliens, it seemed, arrived to collect four stones representing the four basic elements (earth, air, fire and water) - warning their human contacts that the objects were no longer safe on Earth. A few hundred years later (in the 23rd century), a huge ball of molten lava and flame is hurtling toward Earth, and scientist-holy man Victor Cornelius (Ian Holm) declares that in order to prevent it from destroying the planet, the same four elemental stones must be combined with the fifth element, as embodied by a visitor from another world named Leeloo (Milla Jovovich). However, if the force of evil presents itself to the stones instead, the Earth will be destroyed, and an evil being named Zorg (Gary Oldman) will trigger the disaster. Despite her remarkable powers, Leeloo needs help with her mission, and she chooses her accomplice, military leader-turned-cab driver Korben Dallas (Bruce Willis), when she literally falls through the roof of his taxi. Writer and director Luc Besson began writing the script for The Fifth Element when he was only 16 years old, though he was 38 before he was able to bring it to the screen. - Source Mark Deming, Rovi

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58. The X-Files (1998)
Feature film based on the television series The X-Files

The X-Files (also known as The X-Files: Fight the Future) is a 1998 American science fictionthriller film directed by Rob BowmanChris Carter wrote the screenplay. The story is by Carter and Frank Spotnitz. It is the first feature film based on Carter's television series The X-Fileswhich revolves around fictional unsolved cases called the X-Files and the characters solving them. Five main characters from the television series appear in the film: David DuchovnyGillian AndersonMitch PileggiJohn Neville, and William B. Davis reprise their respective roles as FBI agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully, FBI Assistant Director Walter SkinnerWell-Manicured Man, and the Cigarette-Smoking Man. The film was promoted with the tagline Fight the Future.

The film takes place between seasons five (episode "The End") and six (episode "The Beginning") of the television series, and is based upon the series' extraterrestrial mythology.
The story follows agents Mulder and Scully, removed from their usual jobs on the X-Files, and investigating the bombing of a building and the destruction of criminal evidence. They uncover what appears to be a government conspiracy attempting to hide the truth about an alien colonization of Earth.

The film premiered on June 19, 1998, in the United States, and received mixed to positive reviews from critics. Although some enjoyed the style and effects of the film, others found the plot confusing and viewed it as little more than an extended episode of the series. A sequel, titled 
I Want to Believe, was released ten years later. - Source Wikipedia

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57. Snowpiercer (2014)
The most expensive Korean production ever

Based on the French graphic novel "La Transperceneige," Bong Joon-ho's "Snowpiercer" begins in the extremely not-too-distant future as mankind launches a final attempt to halt the spread of global warming once and for all. Needless to say, the plan backfires spectacularly and plunges the world into a new ice age that causes the extinction of all life forms. Luckily, before all this happened, wealthy industrialist Wilford (an inspired bit of casting that I dare not reveal), taking several pages from Ayn Rand, constructed a high-speed luxury train that can circle the globe without stopping or suffering the effects of the weather outside. Now, humanity's last remnants reside on the train—the well-to-do people living in comfort in the head cars with the poor and downtrodden masses stuck in back in cramped quarters and forced to subsist on protein bars made from...well, don't ask what goes into the protein bars. - Source

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56. Iron Man (2008)
Nominated for 2 Academy Awards

Iron Man (2008) is an English sci-fi action film, starring Robert Downey Jr., Jon Favreau and Gwyneth Paltrow, directed by Jon Favreau.

When an industrialist is captured, he constructs a high-tech armoured suit to escape. Once he manages to escape, he decides to use his suit to fight against evil forces and save the world. - Source Classicclips.ca

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55. Children Of Men (2006)
Nominated for 3 Academy Awards

At the center of Alfonso Cuarón’s harsh, sometimes powerful dystopian thriller Children of Men is a premise of stunning force that speaks directly to the malaise of our post-everything age. Very loosely adapted from a nearly prophetic 1992 novel by P. D. James, the film proposes a world in which, for reasons unknown, babies are no longer being born.

Set in 2027, the story opens with television coverage of a public tragedy incalculably more shattering the death of Diana or even the 9/11 attacks: A young man, a media celebrity for no other reason than that he was the last baby born and the youngest human being on the planet, has been killed. The television coverage of this harbinger of the extinction of the human race is one of the most haunting icons of hopelessness I can remember from any film.

It is a truism that every childbirth is a miracle. Children of Men sets that truism in sharp relief, envisioning a world in which a single ordinary conception, pregnancy and childbirth seems almost as miraculous - and portentous - as a virgin birth. - Source Decent Films

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54. Inception (2010)
Winner of 4 Academy Awards, Including Best Cinematography

Nominated for eight Academy Awards, including "Best Picture," and winner of four, Inception - directed by acclaimed filmmaker Christopher Nolan - features an international cast in an original sci-fi actioner that travels around the globe and into the intimate and infinite world of dreams.

Dom Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a skilled thief, the absolute best in the dangerous art of extraction, stealing valuable secrets from deep within the subconscious, during the dream state when the mind is at its most vulnerable. Cobb's rare ability has made him a coveted player in this treacherous new world of corporate espionage, but it has also made him an international fugitive and cost him everything he has ever loved.

Now Cobb is being offered a chance at redemption.

One last job could give him his life back but only if he can accomplish the impossible: inception. Instead of the perfect heist, Cobb and his team of specialists have to pull off the reverse: their task is not to steal an idea but to plant one. If they succed, it could be the perfect crime. But no amount of careful planning or expertise can prepare the team for the dangerous enemy that seems to predict their every move. An enemy that only Cobb could have seen coming. - Source WarnerBros.com

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53. Source Code (2011)
Winner of Scream Awards for Best Science Fiction Actor

Source Code is a 2011 science-fiction action thriller film directed by Duncan Jones and written by Ben Ripley. It stars Jake Gyllenhaal as a U.S. Army captain who is sent into a computed reality to find a bomber. Michelle MonaghanVera Farmiga, and Jeffrey Wright play supporting roles. The film had its world premiere on March 11, 2011 at South by Southwest, and was released by Summit Entertainment on April 1, 2011 in North America and Europe.

The film received favorable reviews from critics and became a box office success, grossing over $147.3 million worldwide - Source Wikipedia

When decorated soldier Captain Colter Stevens (Jake Gyllenhaal) wakes up in the body of an unknown man, he discovers he's part of a mission to find the bomber of a Chicago commuter train. In an assignment unlike any he's ever known, he learns he's part of a government experiment called the Source Code, a program that enables him to cross over into another man's identity in the last 8 minutes of his life. With a second, much larger target threatening to kill millions in downtown Chicago, Colter re-lives the incident over and over again, gathering clues each time, until he can solve the mystery of who is behind the bombs and prevent the next attack. - Source Summit

Source Code is an ingenious thriller that comes billed as science fiction, although its science is preposterous. Does that matter, as long as everyone treats it with the greatest urgency? After all, space travel beyond the solar system is preposterous, and yet we couldn't do without "Star Trek." The "science" in this case is used to prop up an appealing story of a man who tries to change the past.

His name is Colter Stevens (Jake Gyllenhaal). That he is sure of. That's why it's strange when he finds himself on a Chicago commuter train talking to Christina Warren (Michelle Monaghan), a woman he's never met. It's even stranger when he goes into the toilet and sees a face in the mirror that doesn't belong to him. - Source

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52. Clash Of The Titans (2010)
American-Australian action adventure fantasy film and remake of the 1981 film of the same name

In Clash of the Titans, the ultimate struggle for power pits men against kings and kings against gods. But the war between the gods themselves could destroy the world.

Born of a god but raised as a man, Perseus (Sam Worthington) is helpless to save his family from Hades (Ralph Fiennes), vengeful god of the underworld. With nothing left to lose, Perseus volunteers to lead a dangerous mission to defeat Hades before he can seize power from Zeus (Liam Neeson) and unleash hell on earth. Leading a daring band of warriors, Perseus sets off on a perilous journey deep into forbidden worlds. Battling unholy demons and fearsome beasts, he will only survive if he can accept his power as a god, defy his fate and create his own destiny. - Source WarnrBros.com

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Honorable Mentions


Clash Of The Titans (1981)


 
 

51. Fire In The Sky (1993)
Nominated for 4 Saturn Awards

Another great movie given a Bad-Rap by viewers and critics alike. We, however, found the story fascinating, and the special effects Super-Kool. The mystery, suspense and horror wove brilliantly with the plot, the climax (the frieghtening scene when (and where) the abductee awakes and finds himself and ultimatley tries to navigate and escape from) disturbing in its nightmarish realism. - Source Classicclips.ca

Based on an allegedly true account, this film follows the events that befall the inhabitants of a small town when Mike Rogers (Robert Patrick) reports that his buddy Travis Walton (D.B. Sweeney) has been abducted by aliens. The local sheriff suspects that Mike was involved in Travis' disappearance, but when Travis returns with a tale that supports the abduction story, the friends suffer the ridicule and disbelief of the town members and the media. - Source Rotten Tomatoes

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50. The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad (1958)
Considered culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant by the National Film Registry

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad is a 1958 Technicolor heroic fantasy adventure film directed by Nathan H. Juran and starring Kerwin MathewsTorin ThatcherKathryn GrantRichard Eyer, and Alec Mango. It was distributed by Columbia Pictures and produced by Charles H. Schneer.

It was the first of three Sinbad feature films from Columbia, the later two from the '70s being The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973) and Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977). All three Sinbad films were conceptualized by Ray Harryhausen using Dynamation, the full color widescreen stop-motion animation technique that he created.

While similarly named, the film does not follow the storyline of the tale "The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor" but instead has more in common with the Third and Fifth voyages of Sinbad.

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad was selected in 2008 for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congressas being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


The Golden Voyage Of Sinbad (1973)


Sinbad And The Eye Of The Tiger (1977)

 
 

49. The Arrival (1996)
An American-Mexican science fiction horror film 

When it came to sci-fi movies, 1996 was a crowded year: at the high end of the budget spectrum we had the invasion movies Independence Day and Mars Attacks; towards the middle we had John Carpenter's disappointing Snake Plissken sequel Escape From LA, while Rutger Hauer starred in the cheap and cheerful Crossworlds and the brilliantly titled Omega Doom.

Throw in the startlingly botched Island Of Doctor MoreauStar Trek: First Contact, and Stuart Gordon's fun sci-fi oddity Space Truckers, and you have a busy 12 months in genre movies. Somewhat lost in the static was The Arrival, a nifty genre thriller which had the misfortune of coming out just a few weeks before the bigger, splashier Independence Day. A more modest and quirkier movie than Roland Emmerich's invasion flick, The Arrival struggled in US cinemas - a pity, given its mix of smart ideas and outright goofiness.

The Arrival was made by David Twohy, who by the mid-90s had made a name for himself as a genre screenwriter. Critters 2 and Warlock weren't exactly acclaimed, but with his screenplay for the 1993 thriller The Fugitive, which wound up being nominated for seven Oscars, Twohy's reputation shot up a few notches. Twohy made his debut the year earlier with Timescape, a nifty, low-budget time travel thriller which is now so obscure that it's incredibly difficult to find on DVD. Twohy's second film as director, The Arrival, begins as a "first contact" story - anticipating Robert Zemeckis' far pricier Contact, which came out a year later in 1997 - before tipping over into conspiracy thriller territory with distinct shades of The X-Files and Quatermass II. - Source Den of Geek

A shy radio telescope operator named Zane Ziminski (Charlie Sheen) picks up a series of regular signals coming from space -- and deliberately pointed toward Earth. Convinced that he has discovered alien transmissions, Ziminski is first chastised and then fired by his boss (Ron Silver). Obsessed, he builds a makeshift radio telescope in his house to find out where the signals were sent. Convinced that they're intended for aliens already hidden on Earth, he tracks them to a bleak, isolated Mexican village, where he joins forces with a female scientist (Lindsay Crouse), who has suspicions of her own after witnessing an acceleration of global warming. The villagers turn out to be aliens, and the village a front for an underground alien complex. The aliens are here to "terraform" Earth and prepare it for the arrival of the rest of their race, who will die unless they leave their homeworld and colonize elsewhere. Only Ziminski can stop them. Written and directed by David N. Twohy, The Arrival is a throwback to the genre chillers of the '50s. - Source Don Kaye, Rovi

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48. Forbidden Planet (1956)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award

Forbidden Planet is a 1956 American science fiction film, produced by Nicholas Nayfack, directed by Fred M. Wilcox, that stars Walter PidgeonAnne Francis, and Leslie Nielsen. Shot in Eastmancolor and CinemaScope, it is considered one of the great science fiction films of the 1950s, a precursor of contemporary science fiction cinema. The characters and isolated setting have been compared to those in William Shakespeare's The Tempest, and the plot contains certain analogues to the play.

Forbidden Planet pioneered several aspects of science fiction cinema. It was the first science fiction film to depict humans traveling in a faster-than-light starship of their own creation. It was also the first to be set entirely on another planet in interstellar space, far away from Earth.The Robby the Robot character is one of the first film robots that was more than just a mechanical "tin can" on legs; Robby displays a distinct personality and is an integral supporting character in the film. Outside science fiction, the film was groundbreaking as the first of any genre to use an entirely electronic musical score, courtesy of Bebe and Louis Barron.

Forbidden Planet's effects team was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects at the 29th Academy Awards. In 2013, the picture was entered into the Library of CongressNational Film Registry, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Tony Magistrale describes it as one of the best examples of early techno-horror. - Source Wikipedia

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47. Mysterious Island (1961)
Science fiction adventure film 

Mysterious Island (UK: Jules Verne's Mysterious Island) is a 1961 science fiction adventure film about prisoners in the American Civil War who escape in a balloon and then find themselves stranded on a remote island populated by giant mutated animals.

Loosely based upon the 1874 novel The Mysterious Island (L'Île mystérieuse) by Jules Verne (which was the sequel to two other novels by Verne, 1867's In Search of the Castaways and 1870's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea), the film was produced by Charles H. Schneer and directed by Cy Endfield.

Shot in CataloniaSpain, and at Shepperton StudiosSheppertonEngland, the film serves as a showcase for Ray Harryhausen's stop motion animation effects. Like several of Harryhausen's classic productions, the musical score was composed by Bernard Herrmann. The film was remade in 2005. - Source Wikipedia

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46. 12 Monkeys (1995)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award

An intense film about time travel, this sci-fi entry was directed by Terry Gilliam, a member of the comedy troupe Monty Python. The film stars Bruce Willis as James Cole, a prisoner of the state in the year 2035 who can earn parole if he agrees to travel back in time and thwart a devastating plague. The virus has wiped out most of the Earth's population and the remainder live underground because the air is poisonous. Returning to the year 1990, six years before the start of the plague, Cole is soon imprisoned in a psychiatric facility because his warnings sound like mad ravings. There he meets a scientist named Dr. Kathryn Railly (Madeleine Stowe) and Jeffrey Goines (Brad Pitt), the mad son of an eminent virologist (Christopher Plummer). Cole is returned by the authorities to the year 2035, and finally ends up at his intended destination in 1996. He kidnaps Dr. Railly in order to enlist her help in his quest. Cole discovers graffiti by an apparent animal rights group called the Army of the Twelve Monkeys, but as he delves into the mystery, he hears voices, loses his bearings, and doubts his own sanity. He must figure out if Goines, who seems to be a raving lunatic, holds the key to the puzzle. - Source Michael Betzold, Rovi

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45. The Running Man (1987)
Science fiction action film

The Running Man is a 1987 science fiction action film. Its director is Paul Michael Glaser and Arnold Schwarzenegger plays the protagonist Ben Richards. It is set in the year 2017. The economy of the world has collapsed due to of a lack of resources. A totalitarian regimen controls the United States people primarily through TV, which is broadcasted 24 hours a day. The Running Man is the most popular show, where so-called Stalkers, gladiators outfitted with flamboyant costumes and weaponry, hunt and kill prisoners of the state who participate in return for governmental pardon, should they survive it. However, not always does this system work to suppress the people, which forces the government to use violence to subdue them. - Source Fandom

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44. Cube (1997)
Canadian science-fiction horror film

Cube is a 1997 Canadian science-fiction horror film directed and co-written by Vincenzo Natali. A product of the Canadian Film Centre's First Feature Project, the film follows a group of people as they cross industrialized cube-shaped rooms, some rigged with various traps designed to kill.

Cube has gained notoriety and a cult following, for its surreal atmosphere and Kafkaesque setting and concept of industrial, cube-shaped rooms. The film received generally positive reviews, and was followed by two sequels. A remake is in development at Lionsgate. - Source Wikipedia

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43. Resident Evil (2002)
Nominated for 2 Saturn Awards

The director of Mortal Kombat (1995) adapts another popular video game for the big screen with this gory action thriller. Milla Jovovich and Michelle Rodriguez star as Alice and Rain, two members of a commando team assigned to infiltrate the Hive, an underground research laboratory owned by the faceless conglomerate known as the Umbrella Corporation. A bio-engineered virus has been released into the maze-like Hive, turning the facility's employees into mindless, flesh-eating zombies. A single scratch or bite from one of these rampaging ghouls dooms its victim, so the commandos have their work cut out for them as they attempt to reach the Red Queen, the lab's supercomputer -- and their sole hope of halting the spread of the contagion. Before they can complete their mission, however, the soldiers must overcome a variety of deadly obstacles, including mutant dogs, lasers, and a genetically altered beast known as The Licker, whose strength increases with every victim it slays. Alice and Rain also discover that the release of the virus may not have been an accident, and that a cure may exist somewhere in the deadly Hive. Resident Evil co-stars Eric Mabius, James Purefoy, Martin Crewes, and Colin Salmon. - Source Karl Williams, Rovi

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Honorable Mentions


Resident Evil: Apocalypse (2004)





 
 

42. Pitch Black (2000)
Nominated for 1 Saturn Award

Pitch Black (titled The Chronicles of Riddick: Pitch Black on its DVD re-release) is a 2000 American science fiction action film co-written and directed by David Twohy. The film stars Vin DieselRadha MitchellCole Hauser, and Keith David. Dangerous criminal Richard B. Riddick (Diesel) is being transported to prison in a spacecraft. When the spaceship is damaged by comet debris and makes an emergency crash landing on an empty desert planet, Riddick escapes. However, when predatory alien creatures begin attacking the survivors, Riddick joins forces with the surviving crew and other passengers to develop a plan to escape the planet.

Pitch Black was the final film credit of PolyGram Filmed Entertainment, which merged with Universal Pictures during production. It was shot on a modest budget of US$23 million. Despite mixed reviews from critics, it was a sleeper hit, grossing over $53 million worldwide and developing its own cult following, particularly around the antihero Riddick. A sequel, The Chronicles of Riddick, was released in 2004 by Universal, with Diesel back as the title character and Twohy returning as writer and director. A third film, simply titled Riddick, was released in 2013, with Diesel and Twohy reuniting again. - Source Wikipedia

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41. The Green Mile (1999)
Nominated for 4 Academy Awards

Director Frank Darabont, who made an acclaimed feature film debut with The Shawshank Redemption (1994), based on a Stephen King novel set in a prison, returns for a second feature, based on King's 1996 serialized novel set in a prison. In 1935, inmates at the Cold Mountain Correctional Facility call Death Row "The Green Mile" because of the dark green linoleum that tiles the floor. Paul Edgecomb (Tom Hanks) is the head guard on the Green Mile when a new inmate is brought into his custody: John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan), convicted of the sadistic murder of two young girls. Despite his size and the fearsome crimes for which he's serving time, Coffey seems to be a kind and well-mannered person who behaves more like an innocent child than a hardened criminal. Soon Edgecomb and two of his fellow guards, Howell (David Morse) and Stanton Barry Pepper), notice something odd about Coffey: he's able to perform what seem to be miracles of healing among his fellow inmates, leading them to wonder just what sort of person he could be, and if he could have committed the crimes with which he was charged. The Green Mile also stars James Cromwell as the warden; Michael Jeter, Sam Rockwell, and Graham Greene as inmates awaiting dates with the electric chair; and Harry Dean Stanton as a clever trustee. - Source Mark Deming, Rovis

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40. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)
An American Science fiction film

The Incredible Shrinking Man, American science-fiction film, released in 1957, that features an inventive story, an intelligent script, and impressive special effects.

After being exposed to a radioactive cloud, Scott Carey (played by  Grant Williams) discovers that his body is shrinking. As he grows smaller, his understanding of the world - and his role in it - also changes. At one point, he is forced to reside in a dollhouse and battle “giant” spiders and cats just to stay alive. Eventually he is reduced to the size of an atom.

Despite the outlandish premise, The Incredible Shrinking Man was one of the top science-fiction films of the 1950s because of the thought-provoking script by Richard Matheson and strong direction by  Jack Arnold. The camera work and special effects were ingenious for their day and have continued to hold up well. The film inspired  The Incredible Shrinking Woman (1981), which starred Lily Tomlin. - Source britannica.com

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39. Avatar (2009)
Winner of 3 Academy Awards

James Caeron's ultimate, Super-Mega Hollywood Blockbuster, Avatar, took home 3 Academy Awards: Best Visual Effects, Best Cinematography and Best Production Design. Cameron said he had to wait for technology (CGI) to catch up to his visual effect concepts before actual making the picture. For those fortunate enough to see Avatar in 3D on the huge IMAX Screen, it was a once in a lifetime experience. - Source Classicclips.ca

Avatar is not simply a sensational entertainment, although it is that. It's a technical breakthrough. It has a flat-out Green and anti-war message. It is predestined to launch a cult. It contains such visual detailing that it would reward repeating viewings. It invents a new language, Na'vi, as "Lord of the Rings" did, although mercifully I doubt this one can be spoken by humans, even teenage humans. It creates new movie stars. It is an Event, one of those films you feel you must see to keep up with the conversation.

The story, set in the year 2154, involves a mission by U. S. Armed Forces to an earth-sized moon in orbit around a massive star. This new world, Pandora, is a rich source of a mineral Earth desperately needs. Pandora represents not even a remote threat to Earth, but we nevertheless send in ex-military mercenaries to attack and conquer them. Gung-ho warriors employ machine guns and pilot armored hover ships on bombing runs. You are free to find this an allegory about contemporary politics. Cameron obviously does. - Source

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38. Blade Runner (1982)
Seven versions of Blade Runner exist as a result of controversial changes requested by studio executives

Visually spectacular, intensely action-packed and powerfully prophetic since its debut, Blade Runner returns in Ridley Scott's definitive Final Cut, including extended scenes and never-before-seen special effects.

In a signature role as 21st-century detective Rick Deckard, Harrison Ford brings his masculine-yet-vulnerable presence to this stylish noir thriller. In a future of high-tech possibility soured by urban and social decay, Deckard hunts for fugitive, murderous replicants—and is drawn to a mystery woman whose secrets may undermine his soul. This incredible version features the definitive Final Cut of Ridley Scott's legendary sci-fi classic. - Source WarnerBros.com

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Honorable Mentions


Blade Runner 2049 (2017)


 
 

37. Earth Vs The Flying Saucers (1956)
An American black-and-white science fiction film

Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (a.k.a. Invasion of the Flying Saucers and Flying Saucers from Outer Space) is a 1956 American black-and-white science fiction film from Columbia Pictures, produced by Charles H. Schneer, directed by Fred F. Sears, that stars Hugh Marlowe and Joan TaylorEarth vs. the Flying Saucers was released as a double feature with The Werewolf.

The film's storyline was suggested by the bestselling, non-fiction book Flying Saucers from Outer Space by Maj. Donald Keyhoe.

The film's stop-motion animation special effects were created by Ray Harryhausen. - Source Wikipedia

Hugh Marlowe plays scientist Russell Marvin, who is on-hand when an alien spacecraft lands on earth. The saucermen at first insist that they've come in peace, but Marvin suspects otherwise. Sure enough, the visitors eventually declare their intention to take over the earth within the next 60 days, adding that the military's weapons are useless against them. The two-month window gives Marvin and his cohorts plenty of time to build-up superweapon, and thus stave off the seven-saucer invasion force. Special effects maestro Ray Harryhausen does a nice job laying waste to Washington DC in the film's memorable finale. The supporting cast of Earth vs. the Flying Saucers includes those two sci-fi flick stalwarts of the 1950s, Morris Ankrum and Thomas Browne Henry. - Source Hal Erickson, Rovi


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Honorable Mentions


It Came From Outer Space (1953)


Invaders From Mars (1953)

 
 

36. Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan (1982)
 The second film in the Star Trek film series

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is fondly regarded as being the closest in spirit to the 1966-69 TV series that spawned it. Admiral Kirk (William Shatner) escapes the tedium of a desk job to join Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) and Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy (DeForest Kelley) on another space mission. While boldly going where no man etc. etc., Kirk crosses the path of his old enemy Khan (Ricardo Montalban), who as any die-hard Trekker can tell you, was the chief antagonist in the 1966 Trek TV episode "Space Seed." Leading a crew of near-savage space prisoners, Khan insinuates himself into the Genesis Project, which is designed to introduce living organisms on long-dead planets. Intending to harness this program for his own despotic purposes, Khan engages in battle with the Enterprise crew. - Source Hal Erickson, Rovi

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Honorable Mentions


Star Trek (2009)


Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)

 
 

35. Back To The Future (1985)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

In this 1980s sci-fi classic, small-town California teen Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) is thrown back into the '50s when an experiment by his eccentric scientist friend Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) goes awry. Traveling through time in a modified DeLorean car, Marty encounters young versions of his parents (Crispin Glover, Lea Thompson), and must make sure that they fall in love or he'll cease to exist. Even more dauntingly, Marty has to return to his own time and save the life of Doc Brown.

- Source Empire

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 and it grossed over $381 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. It won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, the Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film, and the Academy Awardfor Best Sound Effects Editing. It received three Academy Award nominations, five BAFTA nominations, and four Golden Globe nominations, including Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy). In 2007, the Library of Congress selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry, and in June 2008 the American Film Institute's special AFI's 10 Top 10 designated it the 10th-best science fiction film. The film began a franchise including two sequels, Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990), an animated series, a theme park ride, several video games, a number of comic books, and an upcoming stage musical. - Source Wikipedia


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34. Contact (1997)
Academy Award Nomination for Best Sound Mixing

Contact is a film that takes place at the intersection of science, politics and faith. Those are three subjects that don't always fit easily together. In the film, an alien intelligence transmits an image of three pages of encrypted symbols. It is clear where the corners of each page are. It is also clear that the three corners are intended to come together in some way to make single image. Scientists are baffled in their attempts to bring the pages together. The solution, when we see it, provides an Eureka Moment. It is so simple, and yet so difficult to conceive of. It may be intended as a sort of intelligence test. The encrypted signal, when opened, contains plans for the manufacture of an enormous machine, apparently a space craft of some sort, which will presumably take a single human to a meeting with the alien intelligence on a planet circling Vega, the fifth brightest star in the night sky, about 25 light years away from Earth. - Source  


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33. The Avengers (2012)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

The Avengers grossed over $1.5 billion worldwide and became the third-highest-grossing film of all time, as well as the highest-grossing film of 2012

. - Source Wikipedia

The Avengers (also known as Avengers Assemble in the UK and Ireland) is a 2012 superhero film and the sixth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, based on the superhero team the Avengers created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. The film is a crossover of all the films independently produced by Marvel Studios set within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, namely Iron Man (2008), The Incredible Hulk (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011) and Captain America: The First Avenger (2011). In the film, S.H.I.E.L.D. director Nick Fury assembles Iron ManCaptain America, the HulkThorBlack Widow and Hawkeye to battle Thor's adoptive brother Loki, who attempts to subjugate humanity by leading an invasion by the extraterrestrial race known as the Chitauri. - Source Fandom

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32. Total Recall (1998)
Winner of the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects (Special Achievement Award)

Arnoild Swazzanegger movies are classic, and a heated debate can easily ensue regarding which of his many films desrve top billing. Total Recall, however, was original and innovative in multiple categories, and so we give the nod to the science-fiction action thriller, Total Recall. The special effects alone were revolutionary, which is why it won a Special Achievement Academy Award for its visual effects. One may argue the same case for Terminator 2, Judgement Day, and, we agree, and that's why it's also listed as an honorable mention, only behind Terminator becasue it was also a first of its kind. - Source ClassicClips.ca

In Paul Verhoeven's wild sci-fi action movie Total Recall, Arnold Schwarzenegger plays a 21st-century construction worker who discovers that his entire memory of the past derives from a memory chip implanted in his brain. Schwarzenegger learns that he's actually a secret agent who had become a threat to the government, so those in power planted the chip and invented a domestic lifestyle for him. Once he has realized his true identity, he travels to Mars to piece together the rest of his identity, as well as to find the man responsible for his implanted memory. Verhoeven has created a fast, furious action film with Total Recall, filled with impressive stunts and (literally) eye-popping visuals. Though the film bears only a passing resemblance to the Philip K. Dick short story it was based on ("We Can Remember It For You Wholesale"), the movie is an entertaining, if very violent, ride. - Source Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

 

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31. The Martian (2015)
Nominated for 7 Academy Awards

The Martian, Ridley Scott's film about an astronaut surviving on a desolate planet, is at heart a shipwreck story, one that just happens to take the form of a science fiction adventure. But although the outline offers no surprises, the details and the tone feel new.

Like all the variants of "Robinson Crusoe" - including "Cast Away" and, of course, "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" - this film is about a man, Matt Damon's Mark Watney, who summons all of his ingenuity and courage to endure a seemingly impossible situation, then must deal with loneliness on top of it all. - Source

During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead after a fierce storm and left behind by his crew. But Watney has survived and finds himself stranded and alone on the hostile planet. With only meager supplies, he must draw upon his ingenuity, wit and spirit to subsist and find a way to signal to Earth that he is alive. Millions of miles away, NASA and a team of international scientists work tirelessly to bring "the Martian" home, while his crewmates concurrently plot a daring, if not impossible rescue mission. As these stories of incredible bravery unfold, the world comes together to root for Watney's safe return. Based on a best-selling novel, and helmed by master director Ridley Scott, THE MARTIAN features a star studded cast that includes Jessica Chastain, Kristen Wiig, Kate Mara, Michael Peña, Jeff Daniels, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Donald Glover. - Source Fox

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30. Gravity (2013)
Winner of 7 Academy Awards

Gravity stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in a heart-pounding thriller that pulls you into the infinite and unforgiving realm of deep space. Bullock plays Dr. Ryan Stone, a brilliant medical engineer on her first shuttle mission, with veteran astronaut Matt Kowalsky (Clooney). But on a seemingly routine spacewalk, disaster strikes. The shuttle is destroyed, leaving Stone and Kowalsky completely alone - tethered to nothing but each other and spiraling out into the blackness. The deafening silence tells them they have lost any link to Earth and any chance for rescue. As fear turns to panic, every gulp of air eats away at what little oxygen is left. But the only way home may be to go further out into the terrifying expanse of space. - Source WarnerBros.com

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Honorable Mentions


Apollo 13 (1984)



 

 
 

29. Frankenstein (1933)
The first Sci-Fi / Horror Movie Blockbuster

Frankenstein is a 1931 American pre-Code gothic monster horror film from Universal Pictures. It is about a scientist and his assistant who dig up corpses to build a man animated by electricity. The project goes awry when Frankenstein's assistant accidentally gives the creature an abnormal, murderer's brain. The film was directed by James Whale, and adapted from the play by Peggy Webling, which in turn was based on Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. The created "monster" is portrayed by Boris Karloff in the film. A hit with both audiences and critics, the film was followed by multiple sequels and has become one of the most famous horror films in history.

Frankenstein stars Colin CliveMae ClarkeJohn Boles and Karloff, and features Dwight Frye and Edward van Sloan. The Webling play was adapted by John L. Balderston and the screenplay written by Francis Edward Faragoh and Garrett Fort, with uncredited contributions from Robert Florey and John Russell. The make-up artist was Jack Pierce.

In 1991, the Library of Congress selected Frankenstein for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." - Source Wikipedia


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Honorable Mentions

Bride Of Frankenstein (1935)



 
 

28. It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)
Nominated for 5 Academy Awards

It's a Wonderful Life is a 1946 American Christmas fantasy drama film produced and directed by Frank Capra, based on the short story and booklet The Greatest Gift, which Philip Van Doren Stern wrote in 1939 and published privately in 1943. The film is one of the most beloved in American cinema, and has become traditional viewing during the Christmas season.

The film stars James Stewart as George Bailey, a man who has given up his dreams to help others, and whose imminent suicide on Christmas Eve brings about the intervention of his guardian angelClarence Odbody (Henry Travers). Clarence shows George all the lives he has touched, and how different life in his community of Bedford Falls would be if he had never been born.

Despite performing poorly at the box office due to stiff competition at the time of its release, the film has become a classic and is a staple of Christmas television around the world

It's a Wonderful Life is now considered one of the greatest films of all time. It was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and has been recognized by the American Film Institute as one of the 100 best American films ever made, as number 11 on its initial 1998 greatest movie list, as number 20 on its revised 2007 greatest movie list, and as number one on its list of the most inspirational American films of all time. Capra revealed that it was his personal favorite among the films he directed and that he screened it for his family every Christmas season. - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


Miracle On 34th
Stre et (1947)


A Christmas Carol - aka 'Scrooge '(1951)

 
 

27. Terminator 2 - Judgment Day (1991)
Winner of 4 Academy Awards

Terminator 2 made extensive use of computer-generated imagery (CGI) to vivify the main two Terminators. The use of such technology was the most ambitious since the 1982 and 1984 science fiction films Tron and The Last Starfighter respectively, and would be integral to the critical success of the film. CGI was required particularly for the T-1000, a "mimetic poly-alloy" (liquid metal) structure, since the shapeshiftingcharacter can transform into almost anything it touches. Most of the key Terminator effects were provided by Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) for computer graphics and Stan Winston for practical effects. Creation of the visual effects cost $5 million and took 35 people, including animators, computer scientists, technicians and artists, ten months to produce, for a total of 25 man-years.Despite the large amount of time spent, the CGI sequences only total five minutes of running time. - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


The Terminator (1984)




 
 

26. The Abyss (1989)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

The crew of an experimental, high-tech submersible is called into action to investigate a mysterious nuclear submarine crash. A series of strange encounters leads the crew to suspect the accident was caused by an extraterrestrial craft, and that they may be participating in an encounter with an alien species. However, in order to make contact, they must not only brave the abyss, an exceedingly deep underwater canyon, but also deal with the violent actions of one of their own crew members, an increasingly paranoid Navy SEAL officer. Approved by director James Cameron, The Abyss: Special Edition is an extended director's cut of the 1989 underwater science fiction epic, reinstating nearly a half hour of footage removed from the original release under studio pressure. Much of the restored footage places the film's events in a grander political context, as the crew's mission becomes a factor in the dangerous escalation of nuclear tension between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. The largest change involves the film's ending, which provides further information on the aliens' mission on Earth, bringing the film to closer to Cameron's intention: a modern remake of Robert Wise's The Day the Earth Stood Still. - Source Judd Blaise, Rovi


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25. War Of The Worlds (2005)
Nominated for 3 Academy Awards

A 2005 science fiction disaster film directed by Steven Spielberg, written for the screen by David Koepp and Josh Friedman, and starring Tom CruiseDakota FanningJustin ChatwinTim Robbins and Miranda Otto, narrated by Morgan Freeman and very loosely based on the classic H. G. Wells novel of that name.

Ray Ferrier (Cruise), a dockworker living in New Jersey, is gearing up to spend some time with his estranged kids, teenage Robbie (Chatwin) and 10-year old Rachel (Fanning), while their mother and her boyfriend visit her parents in Boston. After about twenty minutes or so showing the rather strained relationship between them, metal tripods start rising up from underground annihilating everything in their path and strange red weeds begin to grow in abundance on the Earth's surface. Soon, a war between mysterious alien lifeforms and humanity breaks out, and Ray does everything he can to keep his kids and himself safe while they head to Boston in the hopes of regrouping with their family. - Source TV Tropes


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24. Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978)
An American science fiction horror film

Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a 1978 American science fiction horror film directed by Philip Kaufman, and starring Donald SutherlandBrooke AdamsVeronica CartwrightJeff Goldblum and Leonard Nimoy. Released on December 22, 1978, it is a remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), which is based on the novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney. The plot involves a San Francisco health inspector and his colleague who discover that humans are being replaced by alien duplicates; each is a perfect copy of the person replaced, only devoid of human emotion.

Released in the United States over the Christmas weekend 1978, Invasion of the Body Snatchers grossed nearly US$25 million at the box office. It initially received varied reviews from critics, though its critical reception has significantly improved in subsequent years, receiving a 95% on Rotten Tomatoes, and also being hailed as one of the greatest remakes ever as well as one of the best science-fiction horror films of all time. - Source Wikipedia


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23. Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone (2001)
Nominated for 3 Academy Awards

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone is a red-blooded adventure movie, dripping with atmosphere, filled with the gruesome and the sublime, and surprisingly faithful to the novel. A lot of things could have gone wrong, and none of them have: Chris Columbus' movie is an enchanting classic that does full justice to a story that was a daunting challenge. The novel by J.K. Rowling was muscular and vivid, and the danger was that the movie would make things too cute and cuddly. It doesn't. Like an "Indiana Jones" for younger viewers, it tells a rip-roaring tale of supernatural adventure, where colorful and eccentric characters alternate with scary stuff like a three-headed dog, a pit of tendrils known as the Devil's Snare and a two-faced immortal who drinks unicorn blood. Scary, yes, but not too scary - just scary enough. - Source

Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe), who lives in misery with an aunt and uncle that don't want him, learns from a giant named Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane) that he is the orphaned son of powerful wizards. Harry is offered a place at prestigious Hogwarts, a boarding school for wizards that exists in a realm of magic and fantasy outside the dreary existence of normal humans or "Muggles." At Hogwarts, Harry quickly makes new friends and begins piecing together the mystery of his parents' deaths, which appear not to have been accidental after all. The film features alternate-version scenes for every mention of the titular rock. Richard Harris, Alan Rickman, Maggie Smith, John Cleese, and Fiona Shaw co-star. - Source Karl Williams, Rovi

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Honorable Mentions


Prisioner Of Azkaban (2004)


 
 

22. Looper (2015)
Opening film of the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival

Looper is a 2012 American science fiction action film written and directed by Rian Johnson, and produced by Ram Bergman and James D. Stern. It stars Bruce WillisJoseph Gordon-Levitt, and Emily Blunt. It revolves around "present-day" contract killers called "loopers" hired by criminal syndicates from the future to terminate victims that they send back through time.

Looper was selected as the opening film of the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival and was released in the United States on September 28, 2012. The film grossed $176 million on a $30 million budget, while receiving critical acclaim. - Source Wikipedia

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21. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is a landmark, science fiction classic - and probably the best science-fiction film of all time about exploration of the unknown. It was released, coincidentally, at the height of the space race between the USSR and the US. It appeared at the same time as NASA's exploratory Apollo Project with manned Earth orbiting missions - a prelude to orbiting and landing on the Moon with Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969. And it prophetically showed the enduring influence that computers would have in our daily lives.

Director Stanley Kubrick's work is a profound, visionary and astounding film (a mysterious Rorschach film-blot) and a tremendous visual experience. This epic film contained more spectacular imagery (about what space looked like) and special effects than verbal dialogue. Viewers are left to experience the non-verbal, mystical vastness of the film, and to subjectively reach into their own subconscious and into the film's pure imagery to speculate about its meaning. Many consider the masterpiece bewildering, boring, slow-moving or annoying, but are still inspired by its story of how man is dwarfed by technology and space. - Source AMC FilmSite

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20. The Fly (1986)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Makeup

Considered fairly gruesome in its day, the original 1958 The Fly looks like Mister Rogers' Neighborhood compared to this 1986 remake. Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis star as Seth Brundle, a self-involved research scientist, and Veronica Quaife, a science-magazine reporter. Inviting Veronica to his lab, Seth prepares to demonstrate his "telepod," which can theoretically transfer matter through space. As they grow closer over the next few weeks, she inadvertently goads Seth into experimenting with human beings rather than inanimate objects. Seth himself enters the telepod, preparing to transmit himself through the ether -- but he doesn't know that he is sharing the telepod with a tiny housefly. - Source Hal Erickson, Rovi

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Honorable Mentions


The Fly (1958)


 
 

19. Minority Report (2002)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award for Best Sound Editing

Based on a short story by the late Philip K. Dick, this science fiction-thriller reflects the writer's familiar preoccupation with themes of concealed identity and mind control. Tom Cruise stars as John Anderton, a Washington, D.C. detective in the year 2054. Anderton works for "Precrime," a special unit of the police department that arrests murderers before they have committed the actual crime. Precrime bases its work on the visions of three psychics or "precogs" whose prophecies of future events are never in error. When Anderton discovers that he has been identified as the future killer of a man he's never met, he is forced to become a fugitive from his own colleagues as he tries to uncover the mystery of the victim-to-be's identity. When he kidnaps Agatha (Samantha Morton), one of the precogs, he begins to formulate a theory about a possible frame-up from within his own department. Directed by Steven Spielberg, who hired a team of futurists to devise the film's numerous technologically advanced gadgets, Minority Report co-stars Colin Farrell, Max von Sydow, and Neal McDonough. - Source Karl Williams, Rovi

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18. The Matrix (1999)
Winner of 4 Academy Awards

A science fiction action film written and directed by The Wachowskis and starring Keanu ReevesLaurence FishburneCarrie-Anne MossHugo Weaving, and Joe Pantoliano. It depicts a dystopian future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality called "the Matrix", created by sentient machines to subdue the human population, while their bodies' heat and electrical activity are used as an energy source. Cybercriminal and computer programmer Neo learns this truth and is drawn into a rebellion against the machines, which involves other people who have been freed from the "dream world". The Matrix is known for popularizing a visual effect known as "bullet time", in which the heightened perception of certain characters is represented by allowing the action within a shot to progress in slow-motion while the camera's viewpoint appears to move through the scene at normal speed. - Source Wikipedia 

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17. Men In Black (1997)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Makeup

Men in Black is a 1997 science fiction/action/comedy film directed by Barry Sonnenfeld. The film stars Tommy Lee Jones as Agent KWill Smith as Agent J, and Vincent D'Onofrio as Edgar/"Bug". It was based on the Marvel Comic Series, The Men in Black by Lowell Cunningham. It was released on July 2, 1997 and gained $587 million worldwide, with a budget of $90 million. The film was spun off into an animated series, Men in Black: The Series, and two sequels, Men in Black II, released in 2002, and Men in Black III , released in 2012.

- Source Fandom

For his fifth effort as a feature-film director, one-time cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld brought his cartoonish visual style and darkly humorous sensibilities to this adaptation of, appropriately enough, a tongue-in-cheek sci-fi comic book. Will Smith stars as James Darrel Edwards, a New York City cop with an athletic physique and a flippant, anti-authoritarian attitude toward law enforcement. After chasing down a mysterious perpetrator one night who turns out to be an alien, James is recruited by "K" (Tommy Lee Jones), a veteran of a clandestine government agency secretly policing the comings and goings of aliens on planet Earth. Nicknamed the "men in black" for their nondescript uniform of black suit, shoes, tie, and sunglasses, the agents are assigned to recover a bauble that's been stolen by an intergalactic terrorist (Vincent D'Onofrio). It seems the item is none other than the galaxy itself, and its theft has plunged humanity into the center of what's shaping up to become an interstellar war, unless K and his new wisecracking partner, now renamed "J," can stop the bad guy. On their side but somewhat in the dark is a pretty, unflappable city medical examiner (Linda Fiorentino) who has been zapped one too many times by K's ingenious memory-sapping device. Men in Black was a box office smash, inspiring an animated children's television series and a hit soundtrack album that featured a performance by star (and rapper) Smith. - Source Karl Williams, Rovi


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16. Batman (1989)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Production Design

Jack Nicholson is the Joker, who emerged from a horrible accident as a maniacal criminal. Michael Keaton is the Caped Crusader, who emerged from a childhood trauma to become a masked crimefighter. Kim Basinger is Vicki Vale, the talented photojournalist desired by both men. And Batman is the movie, the all-out spectacular directed by Tim Burton, set to songs by Prince and a music score by Danny Elfman, and an Academy AwardO winner* for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration (Anton Furst and Peter Young). - Source Rotten Tomatoes


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Honorable Mentions

Spiderman (2002)


Superman (1978)

 
 

15. The Thing (1982)
One of the best science fiction / horror films ever made

Any argument about whether or not modern remakes can ever be better than the ‘classic’ originals should be ended pretty quickly by mentioning The Thing. With the help of SFX genius Rob Bottin, John Carpenter crafted an intense, frosty sci-fi thriller featuring Hollywood’s ultimate movie monster: one that could be any of us at any time, before contorting into a genuine biological nightmare. - Source Unknown

In remote Antarctica, a group of American research scientists are disturbed at their base camp by a helicopter shooting at a sled dog. When they take in the dog, it brutally attacks both human beings and canines in the camp and they discover that the beast can assume the shape of its victims. A resourceful helicopter pilot (Kurt Russell) and the camp doctor (Richard Dysart) lead the camp crew in a desperate, gory battle against the vicious creature before it picks them all off, one by one. - Source Empire

Back in 1997 Carpenter told Empire that "You'll never, ever, see anything like The Thing again." Like MacReady and Childs we're still waiting. We might be for a long time yet. - Source Empire


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Honorable Mentions

The Thing From Another World (1951)



 
 

14. The Hunger Games (2012)
An American dystopian science fiction-adventure film

Like many science-fiction stories, “The Hunger Games” portrays a future that we're invited to read as a parable for the present. After the existing nations of North America are destroyed by catastrophe, a civilization named Panem rises from the ruins. It's ruled by a vast, wealthy Capitol inspired by the covers of countless sci-fi magazines and surrounded by 12 “districts” that are powerless satellites.

As the story opens, the annual ritual of the Hunger Games is beginning; each district must supply a “tribute” of a young woman and man, and these 24 finalists must fight to the death in a forested “arena” where hidden cameras capture every move.

The story centers on the two tributes from the dirt-poor District 12: Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson). The 16-year-old girl hunts deer with bow and arrow to feed her family; he may be hunkier but seems no match in survival skills. They're both clean-cut, All-Panem types, and although one or both are eventually required to be dead, romance is a possibility. - Source

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Honorable Mentions


The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013)





 

13. Passengers (2016)
Nominated for 2 Academy Awards

Passengers is a 2016 American science fiction romance film directed by Morten Tyldum and written by Jon Spaihts. The film stars Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt as Aurora Lane and Jim Preston, respectively, with Michael Sheen and Laurence Fishburne in supporting roles. The plot depicts two people who are awakened ninety years too early from an induced hibernation on a spaceship, transporting thousands of passengers, travelling to a colony on a planet in a star system 60 light years from Earth.

The film was originally written in 2007 by Spaihts but was kept in development hell, with multiple actors attached over the years. In December 2014, Sony Pictures Entertainment picked up the film's rights, with Tyldum attached to direct. Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence were cast as the two leads in February 2015. The film was produced by Village Roadshow Pictures, Start Motion Pictures, Original FilmLStar CapitalWanda Pictures and Company Films. Principal photographytook place at Pinewood Atlanta Studios in AtlantaGeorgia from September 2015 to February 2016. It is the last film from Columbia Pictures to have the involvement of Village Roadshow Pictures.

Passengers premiered at the Regency Village Theater in Los Angeles on December 14, 2016 and was released theatrically in the United States on December 21, 2016, in 2D and RealD 3Dby Columbia Pictures. The film received mixed reviews from critics, with praise for Lawrence and Pratt's performances, as well as the musical score, visual style and production values, though it was criticized for its plot and characters. It grossed $303 million worldwide, becoming the third-biggest original live-action U.S. release of 2016. The film received two nominations for Best Original Score and Best Production Design at the 89th Academy Awards. - Source Wikipedia

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12. Ex Machina (2014)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

Real science fiction is about ideas, which means that real science fiction is rarely seen on movie screens, a commercially minded canvas that's more at ease with sensation and spectacle. What you more often get from movies is something that could be called "science fiction-flavored product" - a work that has a few of the superficial trappings of the genre, such as futuristic production design and somewhat satirical or sociological observations about humanity, but that eventually abandons its pretense for fear of alienating or boring the audience and gives way to more conventional action or horror trappings, forgetting about whatever made it seem unusual to begin with.

Ex Machina, the directorial debut by novelist and screenwriter Alex Garland ("28 Days Later," "Sunshine"), is a rare and welcome exception to that norm. It starts out as an ominous thriller about a young programmer (Domhnall Gleeson) orbiting a charismatic Dr. Frankenstein-type (Oscar Isaac) and slowly learning that the scientist's zeal to create artificial intelligence has a troubling, even sickening personal agenda. But even as the revelations pile up and the screws tighten and you start to sense that terror and violence are inevitable, the movie never loses grip on what it's about; this is a rare commercial film in which every scene, sequence, composition and line deepens the screenplay's themes - which means that when the bloody ending arrives, it seems less predictable than inevitable.... - Source  

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11. Planet Of The Apes (1968)
Nominated for 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

Planet of the Apes is a 1968 American science fiction film directed by Franklin J. Schaffner. It stars Charlton HestonRoddy McDowallKim HunterMaurice EvansJames WhitmoreJames Daly, and Linda Harrison. The screenplay by Michael Wilson and Rod Serling was loosely based on the 1963 French novel La Planète des Singes by Pierre BoulleJerry Goldsmith composed the groundbreaking avant-garde score. It was the first in a series of five films made between 1968 and 1973, all produced by Arthur P. Jacobs and released by 20th Century Fox.

The film tells the story of an astronaut crew who crash-lands on a strange planet in the distant future. Although the planet appears desolate at first, the surviving crew members stumble upon a society in which apes have evolved into creatures with human-like intelligence and speech. The apes have assumed the role of the dominant species and humans are mute creatures wearing animal skins.

The script was originally written by Rod Serling, but underwent many rewrites before filming eventually began. Directors J. Lee Thompson and Blake Edwards were approached, but the film's producer Arthur P. Jacobs, upon the recommendation of Charlton Heston, chose Franklin J. Schaffner to direct the film. Schaffner's changes included an ape society less advanced—and therefore less expensive to depict—than that of the original novel. Filming took place between May 21 and August 10, 1967, in CaliforniaUtah and Arizona, with desert sequences shot in and around Lake PowellGlen Canyon National Recreation Area. The film's final "closed" cost was $5.8 million.

The film was released on February 8, 1968, in the United States and was a commercial success, earning a lifetime domestic gross of $32.6 million. The film was groundbreaking for its prosthetic makeup techniques by artist John Chambers and was well received by critics and audiences, launching a film franchise, including four sequels, as well as a short-lived television show, animated series, comic books, and various merchandising. In particular, Roddy McDowall had a long-running relationship with the Apes series, appearing in four of the original five films (absent, apart from a brief voiceover, from the second film of the series, Beneath the Planet of the Apes, in which he was replaced by David Watson in the role of Cornelius), and also in the television series.

The original series was followed by Tim Burton's remake Planet of the Apes in 2001 and the reboot Rise of the Planet of the Apes in 2011. Also in 2001, Planet of the Apes was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


Beneath The Planet Of The Apes (1970)


Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes (2014)

 
 

10. Mary Poppins (1964)
Winner of 4 Academy Awards, Including Best Actress

Mary Poppins is a 1964 American musical fantasy film directed by Robert Stevenson and produced by Walt Disney, with songs written and composed by the Sherman Brothers. The screenplay is by Bill Walsh and Don DaGradi, based on P. L. Travers's book series Mary
Poppins
. The film, which combines live-action and animation, stars Julie Andrews in her feature film debut as Mary Poppins, who visits a dysfunctional family in London and employs her unique brand of lifestyle to improve the family's dynamic. Dick Van DykeDavid Tomlinson, and Glynis Johns are featured in supporting roles. The film was shot entirely at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California using painted London background scenes.

Mary Poppins was released on August 27, 1964, to critical acclaim. It received a total of 13 Academy Awards nominations, including Best Picture – a record for any film released by Walt Disney Studios – and won five: Best Actress for Andrews, Best Film EditingBest Original Music ScoreBest Visual Effects, and Best Original Song for "Chim Chim Cher-ee". In 2013, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant." Mary Poppins is considered Walt Disney's crowning live-action achievement, and is the only one of his films which earned a Best Picture nomination during his lifetime. - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


Bedknobs And Broomsticks (1968)

Chitty Chitty Bang BangChitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968)



 


 

9. Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1956)
Considered culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant by the National Film Registry

Science Fiction or Horror? Both, with a tiwst of communist invasion, socio-politival paranoia. Alien Invasion of earth was nothing new by this time with previous movies such as Space Invaders from Mars, War of the worlds, ect., but aliens actually taking over human bodies, was. Indeed, the idea of aliens absorbing the entire being of humans, including their identiry an minds, except for emotions, becasue these aliens have no need of such uselss aspects, was terrifying in itself. Th e aliens were all the same, in essecne, thinking and acting the same. This sameness, oneess was a socio-politivcal paranoia, and although the enemy of democracy hgad been defeated in world war 2, the fear of that the idea itself might remian in some minds, that it might actually fester in the American populace mindset, was very much still real. It was a cutural angst, the fistrust of one's own neighbors, the fear that they may be communists, or at least its sympathizers, and so the enmy is within and may very well manifest itself eventually in the hearts and minds of political leaders. When the film was released domestically in February 1956, many theaters displayed several pods made of papier-mâché in theater lobbies and entrances, along with large lifelike black and white cutouts of McCarthy and Wynter running away from a crowd. The film made more than $1 million in the first month, and in 1956 alone made more than $2.5 million in the U.S. When the British release (with cuts imposed by the British censors took place in late 1956, the film earned more than a half million dollars in ticket sales. - Source Wikipedia


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8. The War Of The Worlds (1953)
Winner of 1 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

1953 American Technicolorscience fiction drama film from Paramount Pictures, produced by George Pal, directed by Byron Haskin and starring Gene Barry and Ann Robinson.The film is a loose adaptation of the novel of the same name by H. G. Wells, the first of five film adaptations. It is a modern retelling of the 1897 novel, changing the setting from Victorian Era England to 1953 southern California, while also being a commentary on the then-ongoing Cold War and the nuclear arms race. Earth is suddenly and unexpectedly invaded by Martians and American scientist Clayton Forrester searches for any weakness that can stop them. The War of the Worldswon an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects and went on to influence other science fiction films. In 2011, it was selected for preservation in the United States' National Film Registry in the Library of Congres - Source Wikipedia


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Honorable Mentions


Earth Vs The Flying Saucers (1956)


The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951)

 
 

7. E.T. - The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
Winner of 4 Academy Awards

A Science fiction film produced and directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Melissa Mathison. It features special effects by Carlo Rambaldi and Dennis Muren, and stars Henry ThomasDee WallacePeter CoyoteRobert MacNaughtonDrew Barrymore and Pat Welsh. It tells the story of Elliott (Thomas), a boy who befriends an extraterrestrial, dubbed "E.T.", who is stranded on Earth. Elliott and his siblings help E.T. return to his home planet, while attempting to keep him hidden from the government. - Source Wikipedia

Both a classic movie for kids and a remarkable portrait of childhood, E.T. is a sci-fi adventure that captures that strange moment in youth when the world is a place of mysterious possibilities (some wonderful, some awful), and the universe seems somehow separate from the one inhabited by grown-ups. Henry Thomas plays Elliott, a young boy living with his single mother (Dee Wallace), his older brother Michael (Robert MacNaughton), and his younger sister Gertie (Drew Barrymore). Elliott often seems lonely and out of sorts, lost in his own world. One day, while looking for something in the back yard, he senses something mysterious in the woods watching him. And he's right: an alien spacecraft on a scientific mission mistakenly left behind an aging botanist who isn't sure how to get home. Eventually Elliott puts his fears aside and makes contact with the "little squashy guy," perhaps the least threatening alien invader ever to hit a movie screen. As Elliott tries to keep the alien under wraps and help him figure out a way to get home, he discovers that the creature can communicate with him telepathically. Soon they begin to learn from each other, and Elliott becomes braver and less threatened by life. E.T. rigs up a communication device from junk he finds around the house, but no one knows if he'll be rescued before a group of government scientists gets hold of him. In 2002, Steven Spielberg re-released E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in a revised edition, with several deleted scenes restored and digitally refurbished special effects. - Source Mark Deming, Rovi


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6. The Wizard Of Oz (1947)
Nominated for 5 Academy Awards

The Wizard of Oz, a legendary movie that has enchantand the minds and warned the hearts of genrations of children and adults alike, will remain the most....won an Academy Award for Best Original Musical Score. Judy Garland, as Dorthy Gale, and her renditiie of (the song Over The Rainbow was written for the movie) 'Somewhere Over The Rainbow' Sofia Coppola's second film is the ultimate jet lag movie, locating its central almost-romance between listless college grad Scarlett Johansson and life-worn actor Bill Murray amid the woozy, daydreamy bewilderment of being in a very foreign country and a very different time zone. And it's exactly right that we stilldon't know what he whispered to her at the end. - Source Classicclips.ca


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5. Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (1978)
Winner of 2 Academy Awards

Science fiction film written and directed by Steven Spielberg, and starring Richard Dreyfuss,Melinda DillonTeri GarrBob BalabanCary Guffey, and François Truffaut. It tells the story of Roy Neary, an everyday blue-collar worker in Indiana, whose life changes after an encounter with an unidentified flying objects. In December 2007, it was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. A Special Edition of the film, featuring additional scenes, was released theatrically in 1980. A third cut of the film was issued on VHS and LaserDisc in 1998 (and later DVD and Blu-ray). The film was remastered in 4K and re-released in theatres on September 1, 2017 for its 40th anniversary.- Source Wikipedia


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4. Jurassic Park (1993)
Winner of 3 Academy Awards

Science fiction adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and produced by Kathleen Kennedyand Gerald R. Molen. The dinosaurs were created with groundbreaking computer-generated imagery by Industrial Light & Magic and with life-sized animatronic dinosaurs built by Stan Winston's teamThe first installment in the Jurassic Park franchiseWhen dinosaurs first ruled the movie-Earth, they did so in a herky-jerky stop-motion manner that while charmingly effective, required a fair dose of disbelief-suspension. When Steven Spielberg brought them back on Isla Nublar, we felt for the first time they could be real, breathing animals (as opposed to monsters). And that's as much thanks to Stan Winston's astonishing animatronics work as to ILM's groundbreaking CGI. The film won more than twenty awards, including three Academy Awards for its technical achievements in visual effects and sound design. Jurassic Park is considered a landmark in the development of computer-generated imagery and animatronic visual effects, and was followed by four commercially successful sequelsThe Lost World: Jurassic Park(1997), Jurassic Park III (2001), Jurassic World (2015) and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom(2018), with a fifth and final sequel, currently titled Jurassic World 3, scheduled for a 2021 release. - Source Wikipedia


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3. Alien (1979)
Winner of 2 Academy Awards

"In space, no one can hear you scream." A close encounter of the third kind becomes a Jaws-style nightmare when an alien invades a spacecraft in Ridley Scott's sci-fi horror classic. On the way home from a mission for the Company, the Nostromo's crew is woken up from hibernation by the ship's Mother computer to answer a distress signal from a nearby planet. Capt. Dallas's (Tom Skerritt) rescue team discovers a bizarre pod field, but things get even stranger when a face-hugging creature bursts out of a pod and attaches itself to Kane (John Hurt). Over the objections of Ripley (Sigourney Weaver), science officer Ash (Ian Holm) lets Kane back on the ship. The acid-blooded incubus detaches itself from an apparently recovered Kane, but an alien erupts from Kane's stomach and escapes. The alien starts stalking the humans, pitting Dallas and his crew (and cat) against a malevolent killing machine that also has a protector in the nefarious Company. - Source Lucia Bozzola, Rovi


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Honorable Mentions


Aliens (1986)


 
 

2. Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King (2003)
Winner of 11 Academy Awards, Including Best Picture

Epic fantasy adventure film based on the second and third volumes of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. The Return of the King became one of the most critically and commercially successful films of all time At the 76th Academy Awards, it won all 11 Academy Awards for which it was nominated, therefore holding the record for highest Oscar sweep. The wins included the awards for Best Picture, the first time a fantasy film had done so; it was also the second sequel to win Oscars for Best Picture and Best Director (following The Godfather Part II). The film jointly holds the record for the largest number of Academy Awards won with Ben-Hur (1959) and Titanic(1997). The film has been re-released three times: in 2011, 2017, and 2018. - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


Lod Of The Rings: The Fellowhsip Of The Rings (2001)


 

1. Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977)
Winner of 7 Academy Awards

An epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill,Harrison FordCarrie FisherPeter CushingAlec GuinnessDavid ProwseJames Earl JonesAnthony DanielsKenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star. Star Wars is the second-highest-grossing film in North America the U.S. Library of Congress's National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". - Source Wikipedia

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Honorable Mentions


The Empire Strikes Back (1980)


Return Of The Jedi (1983)